How to convert grades into percentages in the New Google Forms Quiz

I love the quiz feature in the new Google Forms because you can format it to allow your students to see their marks right away. However, the mark does not appear as a percentage, instead it appears only as number of correct answers, for example: 16/25. As a teacher, sometimes you need to convert that result into a percentage.

I am not a Google Sheets person, so I turned to my super geeky and talented friend, Jen Giffen for some help. Here is her solution:

  1. Insert two blank columns to the right of your marks.

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  1. In the first blank column in row 2, type =left(

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  1. Click the first mark in column B. B2 will automatically appear (or whatever cell number the first mark is in)

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  1. Type ,2) then hit Enter

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  1.  The original mark will appear in the C column. Now click on the D column.

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  1. Type = then tap the mark in the B column.

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  1. Type / and the total your quiz is out of, then tap the % symbol

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  1. You will now get a percentage in column D.

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9. To complete all percentage conversions, drag down the bottom right corner of Column C.

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  1. Now do the same for Column D

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  1. NOTE: If you try to cut and paste these percentages on a new spreadsheet, you will get this:

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  1. So you need to use “Paste special” then “Paste values only”.

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THANKS, JEN!!!

TEAM Digital Breakout EDU, Canadian Style

Last week I was invited by my friends Kim Pollishuke and Jenn Casa-Todd to play a collaborative, live, on-line game of Digital Breakout EDU via Google Hangouts.

The timing could not have been better for me, as a few days later, I was due to travel to Irvine, California with the EdTechTeam to facilitate, among other sessions, a session on Digital BreakoutEDU. But I had very little experience with it, so I was delighted for the opportunity to test it out with friends, Sandra Chow, Larissa Aradj, Scott Monahan, Jen Giffen, and Les McBeth, and others. Kim and Jenn were beta-testing the game for a large, online game planned for TeachOntario, Feb. 23.

For those of you who are new to the concept of breakout games, they are essentially games that are devised with a series of problems that need to be solved in order to “break out” of room, or a box, or, in the case of Digital Breakout EDU, a Google form. Last year James Sanders and Mark Hammons spearheaded the Breakout EDU movement in education, which, due to its tremendous popularity amongst educators, evolved into a fully fledged separate entity, Breakout EDU, with a huge Facebook group and new games appearing every day.

Some time later, Mari Venturino and Justin Birckbichler came up with a digitalized version of Breakout EDU, using Google Sites, locked Google forms, and many other tools to create games with. You can check out all the games here.

The digitalized game that Kim and Jenn created was a lot of fun and gave me many ideas for my GAFESummit presentation. Since I am Canadian and the summit was in the United States, I decided to base the game on facts about Canada. I also decided to make it a team game by placing teachers into groups and challenging them to see who would break out the fastest. A few days before the conference, I tested it out with my students. I split my class into 5 teams, and each student had a Chromebook to work on to try to solve the puzzles. 5 minutes into the game, I knew that it was going to be a tremendous success as my students were immediately engaged, working collaboratively, and having tons of fun.

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I love the physical version of the game, but several factors of the digitalized version make it stand out as a very appealing alternative.

  1. No purchase of a box necessary.

  2. No locks to worry about re-setting.

  3. No kit components to worry about losing.

  4. 100% student engagement if you have many devices for them to work on. No one feels left out or unable to contribute.

  5. Zero time required for set up (unless you make up your own game).

  6. Great opportunity for students to create their own games.

  7. Can be played live online via video-conferencing.

At my session in Irvine, 70 teachers played the game. I divided them into 6 groups. Some groups stayed in the room and some groups left to find a quiet place to solve the game.

After 20 minutes, we had a winner: Group 1!

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The energy in the room was high, and I can honestly say that it was the most fun I have ever had in a training session for teachers. Click below for the games!

  1. Team Digital Breakout EDU for students

  2. Team Digital Breakout EDU for teachers

  3. Team Digital Breakout EDU en français

NOTE: Each team has a separate game because there is a shared, editable Google doc as one of the clues to solve. Each team needs to work collaboratively on the document, but separately from the other teams.

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100 Sketchnotes of Inspiration

(This is a cross-post from the EdTechTeam Blog)

Many thanks to Kim Pollishuke for writing this review about my book, “Sketchnotes for Educators.” (SD)

2017 couldn’t have started off better when I checked the mail on January 3rd. Sylvia Duckworth’s new book Sketchnotes for Educators: 100 Inspiring Illustrations for Lifelong Learners arrived!

A few years ago, when I joined Twitter (see page 172), Sylvia’s sketchnotes quickly caught my eye. I had seen people doodle before but never like this. What a beautiful and succinct way to capture learning! I followed her and eagerly waited for each new drawing. Soon after, I was lucky to have the chance to meet her and she became part of my growing PLN (see pages 166 & 178).

What I love about Sylvia is her willingness to step out of her comfort zone (see page 28). I couldn’t believe that her very first sketchnote was only in 2015! What a risk she took, trying something new and then sharing her efforts publicly so that others could learn alongside her.

 

Reading this book will replenish your educator’s soul. On those days when you come home tired and frustrated, turn to page 54 and discover the “10 Steps to Happiness” or page 22 to learn about “Life”. On the days when you come home feeling like you just got it all wrong and you’re stuck, open page 72 to compare a “Growth Mindset vs Fixed Minded” or page 156 to begin walking the path out of “Stagnation”.

Now, on those great days when you come home feeling awesome because your students demonstrated problem solving, collaborative and critical thinking skills, flip to page 70 to see how you have a truly innovative classroom. When you wake up feeling like you can take on the world, jump to page 32 for “10 Things We Can Learn from Superheroes”.

Want to learn about Google tools, Breakout EDU, digital citizenship or effective leadership and innovation?  Sketchnotes for Educators really does have it all. This is not a book that you will read and then stick on a shelf to collect dust. This is that special book that you will want to have at your fingertips for years to come. At least I know I will.
Thank you, Sylvia!

Kim Pollishuke
Google for Education
Certified Innovator and Trainer
Digital Literacy Resource Teacher
Thornhill, Ontario

 

My Top 10 Sketchnotes in 2016

As the clock ticks down to the end of 2016, it’s a perfect time to reflect on the past 12 months. I derive a huge pleasure in creating drawings related to education and then sharing them on social media. A question I often get is, “What are your most popular sketchnotes?” Well, thanks to Twitter, it’s easy to get hard statistics to find out the answer. So here they are, in order from 10 to 1. Make sure to read to the end to find out the most popular sketchnote for 2016!

#10: The Benefits of Creativity (134 retweets)

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#9: Three Questions to Ask Your Child Every Day (135 retweets)

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#8: Modes of Thinking (168 retweets)

8

#7: Teaching Digital Citizenship (173 retweets)

7#6: 10 Reasons to Use Inquiry-based Learning (181 retweets)

6

#5: 10 Reasons Why Every Teacher Needs a PLN (221 retweets)

5

#4: 10 Growth Mindset Phrases for Teachers (225 retweets)

4

#3: 10 Things We Can Learn from Superheroes (241 retweets)

3

#2: Seven Digital Citizenship Rules (293 retweets)

2#1: A Checklist for Today’s Teachers (413 retweets)

1

Click here to read about my most popular sketchnotes for 2015. NOTE: Free downloads for these drawings can be found on my Flickr site or in my book, 100 Sketchnotes for Educators. (Click here to order.)

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My sketchnote book

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(This is a cross-post from the EdTechTeam blog)

I have been pinching myself for days, ever since the dream of creating a book with my sketchnotes became a reality with the recent announcement from the EdTechTeam Press for book pre-ordering.

You see, I stopped drawing when I was around ten years old. I lost my love for art, as many kids do when they grow up. I did not believe I was a good artist, so what was the point?

Fast-forward forty-five years: In 2014, I started to notice some beautiful drawings related to education showing up on social media. People were taking notes from conferences and creating drawings in a doodling fashion. I learned it was called “sketchnoting,” and I thought I would give it a try. I uploaded my first drawing to Flickr and Tweeted it out in January 2015. I never imagined in my wildest dreams that anyone would be interested in my drawings.

But educators were interested in my drawings, and before long, I was hooked on sketchnoting. I loved being able to express my ideas in a creative way, and the fact that my drawings seemed to resonate strongly with my PLN (Personal/Professional Learning Network) made me yearn to create more. I was on the constant hunt for interesting things to draw related to education: blog posts, graphics, articles, posters. Some ideas I borrowed from others, some ideas I came up with on my own.

With much surprise, I noticed that people were Tweeting photos of my drawings displayed on classroom and staffroom walls. The Iceberg Illusion in particular, went viral, even appealing to people outside the educational community: entrepreneurs, athletes, coaches, writers, and managers. It thrilled me to know that my drawings were being shared and appreciated in so many ways.

The book is a collection of 100 of my most popular sketchnotes (which I have heard some people also refer to as edusketches since they often have to do with education). I created the book to provoke conversations about some of the topics covered, to entice readers to go to the original resource if referenced in the drawing, to provide links where the pieces can be downloaded, and to inspire readers to try sketchnoting themselves.

I would like to thank Holly Clark and the EdTechTeam press for believing in my book and for supporting me in this journey. I would also like to thank my PLN for encouraging me to continue to create and share my drawings. I am in constant awe of the brilliant teaching community around me and you are my inspiration.

(Please click here to pre-order the book.)

 

Calling all French Second Language Teachers!

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Keeping Twitter lists up-to-date is very difficult. I used to have one for French teachers but then my life got busy (who can relate?) and I gave up adding to it. So yesterday I put out a plea to my PLN on Twitter and Facebook (Ontario French Teachers group) and voilà: within 24 hours I had 60 names on the shared Google doc!

If you are an FSL teacher and haven’t added your name yet, please do! And please forward the list to any other FSL teachers you might know so that they can add their names. This will be a great go-to list for any FSL teacher looking to make more connections on Twitter.

Click here for the list.

Keep on being awesome, my #FSL PLN!

Love, Sylvia

 

 

 

 

 

Facebook Fail

(WARNING: Disturbing content)

Every now and then you come across a social media post so vile and offensive, it makes you sick to the stomach and you wonder what horrific set of circumstances created such a hateful person.

I had the misfortune of coming across one of these posts recently in my Facebook feed. I’m not sure how this happened as I’m pretty sure none of my friends would be friends with this monster. Which makes the whole thing even more disturbing, as his posts must turn up randomly on many Facebook users feeds.

A peak at his Facebook page revealed him to be a regular poster of racist, homophobic and misogynistic content. Here are just a few (I have covered his name to prevent me from becoming one of his targets. I get the feeling that he’s a psychopath; best not to aggravate such types)

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So, I decided to report these posts because, well, Facebook has strict Community Standards, doncha know.

Within a few hours, I got this response for each of the posts I reported:

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They removed one post (but not the ones you see, above, which are still there).

In light of the horrific Leslie Jones debacle I am shocked that Facebook does not take a stronger stance against hate-mongering trolls. The fact that they allow this deranged man to continue his vitriolic posts publicly for all to see means that they condone his behaviour, and others like him.

It is time for social media platforms to take responsibility for the hate they are allowing to germinate by taking a firmer stand against trolls. Facebook, I am so terribly disappointed in you.